Pheasant Backs?

Tips & Tricks for finding and preparing those tasty Spring Morels.

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bwteal
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Pheasant Backs?

Postby bwteal » May Mon 01, 2017 11:16 pm

Has anyone ever tried Pheasant Back mushrooms? My brother in law and a nephew have been finding them. Are there other varieties in Northern In that are look-a-likes but dangerous? I never heard much about these before... How do they taste?
Have Perch...will travel...
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fishlips
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Re: Pheasant Backs?

Postby fishlips » May Tue 02, 2017 10:24 am

I never heard of them?? Noboat will know
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Re: Pheasant Backs?

Postby Nobote » May Mon 08, 2017 9:36 pm

Pheasants back (Polyporus squamosas) are easy to identify. Raw they taste like cucumbers, cooked they taste like pants. They are tough.
They fruit primarily on dead wood, but occasionally on living trees. No polypores are known to be poison or sickeners.
I dont waste any time on Pheasants backs.

Fruiting now and fair to eat are Fawn mushrooms (Pluteus cervinus), and a few edible agaricus species..Agaricus bitorquis, A. brunescens and allies should be appearing with all the rain we have had.
You never see a fishing boat parked in front of a psychiatrists office .....

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